January 18, 2017

Believe in Magic: User Experience Designer Rebecca Ussai at 57th CreativeMornings gathering in Chicago


One of the few times the CreativeMornings/Chicago chapter had an interface/interaction designer as a speaker was Jason Fried in 2011, who co-founded Basecamp, which is both the company and popular Web-based project management app. At the chapter’s second gathering (see my write-up), Fried offered his version of design principles, primarily dealing with clarity.

Fast forward to September, 2016, Rebecca Ussai, a user-experience design director in ad agency R/GA at the time, shared her angle on design principles at the 57th CreativeMornings/Chicago chapter meetup. Whereas Fried aligns himself to software that is useful throughout its design and build, Ussai finds insight and inspiration in Disney, whose storytelling and world-building in their animated films have become a source of reference in her work on digital projects. The long captivating appeal of Disney’s animated films is due to their execution. Their narrative substance (emotions, ideals) and style (simple focus of plot) influence Ussai’s sensibilities. She’s allowed the magic of Disney’s filmmaking to infuse her designing. To her, user-experience design and Disney are strongly connected.(1)

Connections
“Eventually everything connects—people, ideas, objects…the quality of the connections is the key to quality per se.”
—Charles Eames, Pioneering Designer, 1907–1978)
Ussai reinforced design as a discipline characterized by making connections between entities, however disparate. She connected the practice of user-experience design with the discipline of animated storytelling, exclusively the Disney model. Dubbed “UX Choreography,” she gave a tour of her five principles motivating and guiding her work. Most of which are relatively intuitive:
  1. Feedback
  2. Feedforward
  3. Spatial awareness
  4. User focus
  5. Brand voice
All of these, curated as a set of affirmations—is nothing new. Though “UX Choreography” is a regurgitation, it’s a recurring reminder of factors that people, not just those in the design world, should be mindful of in solving and making things.

With the connecting reflex in mind, I was making connections per principle that Ussai was elaborating. It was also an exercise in traceability.

With Ussai’s principle of “Feedback”—when a system communicates running results of an interaction in a manner that promotes understanding, I recalled web usability specialist Jakob Nielsen’s “10 Usability Heuristics for User Interface Design” from 1995. The top rule of thumb is “Visibility of system status”:
“The system should always keep users informed about what is going on, through appropriate feedback within reasonable time.”
Matching Nielsen’s principle, Ussai’s take on “Feedback” centers on mobile computing. Beyond the screen, feedback applies to workflow, indicated by this recent article “Running productive design critiques” where feedback is a refrain.

The second principle of “Feedforward” speaks to interaction designer Dan Saffer’s advocacy of what he coined “microinteractions.” To Saffer, these “are contained product moments that revolve around a single use case—they have one main task. Every time you change a setting, sync your data or devices, set an alarm, pick a password, log in, set a status message, or favorite or ‘like’ something, you are engaging in a microinteraction. They are everywhere: in the devices we carry, the appliances in our homes, the apps on our phones and desktops, even embedded in the environments we live and work in.”

Ussai’s principle of “Spatial awareness” has roots in architecture. The architect Eero Saarinen expressed it perfectly: “Always design a thing by considering it in its next larger context—a chair in a room, a room in a house, a house in an environment, an environment in a city plan.”

The fourth principle of “User focus” recalls Allen Hurlburt’s classic book “Layout: the design of the printed page” (1977). In it, there’s a section called “Grids and systems.” These are tools for achieving a hierarchy of information. From Hurlburt, “A designer’s grid organizes specific content in relation to the precise space it will occupy.” At the time, the “precise space” was the printed page. But this concept easily connects with today’s digital display, especially the handheld mobile phone that dominated Ussai’s presentation.

Ussai’s last “UX Choreography” principle of “Brand voice” connects with the performance toolkit of “method acting,” whose goal is performing an honest portrayal—demonstrating an ease and economy of sincerity, or to use the overly propagandized synonym: “authenticity.”

What Ussai recommended can be connected or traced to something else. Our remix culture affords this kind of tethering.

When it came to the optimal time to utilize her toolkit of principles, Ussai emphasized the beginning of a project. Makes sense. But as the author Kurt Vonnegut keenly pointed out in his 1990 novel “Hocus Pocus”: “Another flaw in the human character is that everybody wants to build and nobody wants to do maintenance.” “Maintenance” is the operative step here. “UX Choreography” can and should be engaged throughout a project’s duration, before, during and after—not only at the height of a project’s start. Because principles are pliable. They can bend over time.

And in time, it would be great to see Ussai diversify her presentation beyond the bubble of the mobile interface to other spaces. “User experience” is a multiverse. The principles identified in “UX Choreography” connect with other disciplines, such as product design and service design, even health care, and other events, such as enrolling for job benefits, buying an insurance policy, completing and delivering taxes, voting, including writing this 57th CreativeMornings/Chicago-related write-up of mine. The blinking cursor is an awesome “Feedforward” detail. At the same time, it gives consistent “Feedback.” A visual pulse in decision-making: To write on or not to write on.

Magic
“Those who don’t believe in magic will never find it."
—Roald Dahl, Pioneering Author, 1916–1990
Seven years ago, Apple Co-Founder and then CEO Steve Jobs said, “We want to kick off 2010 by introducing a truly magical and revolutionary new product.” The first-generation iPad was launched. At the time, journalists and tech reporters poked fun at Jobs’ use of the word “magical.” They missed the essential qualities of delight, satisfaction, or to use another word that also happens to be overly advertised in designer circles and therefore not surprisingly used by Ussai in her talk: “empathy.” Jobs recognized the empowering convergence of engineering, design and marketing. He believed in, as his biographer Walter Isaacson put it, “the magic of technology.”

The highly scalable quality of “magic” to help people be happy and productive. Something wonderful to believe in.


(1) Not a surprise that Ussai highlighted Disney, a legendary studio that’s kicking ass in producing and marketing blockbuster movies—one tiny example, persisting the “Star Wars” mythology (whether we like it or not).

• • •

As Rebecca Ussai detailed her five working principles, inspired by Disney’s narrative substance and style of their animated films, I recalled other connections claimed and seized by designers. There are designers, particularly in the same field of Ussai’s user-experience design (UXD), who connect with the storytelling model of comics, notably the 1993 book “Understanding Comics” by Scott McCloud. There are designers who align their creative processes to the rhythms and movements of dance. Starting this write-up coincides with the birthday of local design legend Gerald Arpino who founded the Joffrey Ballet in Chicago. There are designers who channel the lens of filmmaking, such as the book “The Film Sense” (1969) by director and theorist Sergei Eisenstein.

• • •

While Ussai enjoys Disney, illustrator and visual development artist Lissy Marlin adores the narrative flow and emotion in the animated films by Hayao Miyazaki, who co-founded Studio Ghibli, who make acclaimed anime feature films, like “Princess Mononoke” (1997), “Spirited Away” (2001), “Howl’s Moving Castle” (2004), among many more works. Read my interview with Marlin as part of my series celebrating Makers—83 interviews and growing!

• • •

Big thanks: to Braintree (who also hosted), Green Sheep, Lyft Chicago, for being Partners of monthly Chicago CreativeMornings #57; to organizers Kim Knoll and Kyle Eertmoed who both spoke at Chicago CreativeMornings #7; to the team of volunteers for greatly helping to have CreativeMornings happen monthly in Chicago.

Especially big thanks: to Tina Roth Eisenberg—Swissmiss—for inventing CreativeMornings in 2008.

• • •

Read more CreativeMornings coverage.


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January 16, 2017

Pride, Work and Necessity of Side Projects: May Shek & Her Collaborators Take A Stand



What are you working on—on the side?

Immediately after the election that surprised practically everybody, it became apparent to me that we had to take action of some sort, as quickly as possible. I asked myself what skills, and which people and resources, I could get together and mobilize.

The Take A Stand Project was born swiftly after a few emails, phone calls and brainstorming with some badass women over coffee. Working collectively, four designers each selected a cause that was likely to be under increasing pressure over the next four years and that we wanted to take a stand for, and designed a silk scarf bearing a supportive message; the profits from each sale would go to a non-profit organization working for that cause.

We launched the project exactly a month after the election. 100% of the profit from each sale will be donated to Planned Parenthood, The Trevor Project, National Organization for Women and International Refugee Assistance Project. We want this initiative to continuously celebrate and promote diversity in the ways we create, connect and live.

As writer Rebecca Solnit reminds us, “The ability to tell your own story, in words or images, is already a victory, already a revolt.” We are designers and we have stories to tell. Creating is our small way to contribute to a revolt.



How do you manage to work
on your side project(s)?

I have to say, it has been an exhausting few months to pull together a project with a full-time job. I can only get it done because:

I didn’t do it alone
I couldn’t have done this in isolation. The moment I started putting the initial idea out there, I was greeted by enthusiasm and generous help from friends and members of the design community. Karla Mickens (bottom right), Raquel Martinez (bottom left), Jenny Christian (upper right) and I each designed a scarf; and while I was putting together the website and sending designs into production, Tara Gupta was helping us craft the right message to get the word out.

I let the side project have a life of its own

A project doesn’t have to be perfect from the start. After launch, it will evolve, and giving it room to surprise you allows it to gain its own momentum. (And it did! Design Feast was curious to feature and promote it!)

Remind myself that I’m never too busy 
for something I care deeply about

This is a motto that the chair of my graduate program, Debbie Millman, taught me. It helps me carve out time and brain space for The Take A Stand Project.

Why have a side project?

Side projects reveal who we are, what we stand for and who we care about. Because it is the thing that’s worth losing hours of sleep over, squeezing time between conference calls to ship products, and lugging boxes of packaging supplies across town. They are projects that wouldn’t have happened, if you didn’t really want them to—they always give you back more than you gave them.

At a time when marginalized communities and organizations who support them are threatened, side projects matter more than ever. We can’t even begin to fix everything with the scarves we design, but we can show up, lift each other up and give it a darn good fight.

• • •

Diptych courtesy of May Shek and The Take A Stand Project team.

• • •

Read more about the joy of side projects.


This series, devoted to side projects, is delivered in association with 50,000feet, an independent creative agency dedicated to helping brands and businesses soar.


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January 9, 2017

Pride, Work and Necessity of Side Projects: The Drakes’ Bright Night Project



What are you working on—on the side?

The Bright Night Project started as a simple wine-fueled idea to have an art exhibition in the dark. It then grew into a 4-month epic project that ate all our evenings, weekends and spare moments. A collaboration between myself, Leigh-Anne Drakes and the solar-powered lamp Little Sun. We selected 23 South African artists, illustrators and photographers. Each was tasked with creating an original work around the theme of light.

In order to fund the exhibition, we launched a successful IndieGogo campaign and raised $11,780 by 149 backers, across 15 countries.

The actual event took place in the Old Transvaal Post Office in the heart of Johannesburg. We blacked out the venue and hung each artwork lit only by a Little Sun. Over 450 people came to explore the space with their own Little Suns. After the exhibition, all the lights used were donated to Mophela Primary in KwaZulu-Natal.

Contributing artists: Kent Andreasen, Maaike Bakker, Mzwandile Buthelezi, Elford/de la Forêt, Jean de Wet, Rohan Etsebeth, Rikus Ferreira, Jono Garrett, Ross Garrett, Koos Groenewald, Jana Hamman, Hanro Havenga, Bruce Mackay, Ian Marley, Louis Minaar, Karabo Poppy Moletsane, Kristin-Lee Moolman, Slim, Sindiso Nyoni, Travys Owen, Paul Samuels, Chris Saunders and Warren van Rensburg.



How do you manage to work
on your side project(s)?

Ross Drakes: Evenings and weekends. In truth, when you are excited by something, it becomes easy to carve out the time to do it. I think a little bit of delusion also helps. You start the project thinking that is it going to be really simple and easy to pull off. By the time you realise it’s a monster, you already invested too much time into it to quit. I love what I do, so it’s easy to not watch that TV show and spend the time doing something else instead.

Leigh-Anne Drakes: I think if a side project is a passion project, you just sort of find the time, y’know? Suddenly that TV series everybody is raving about seems less important, and the excitement fuels you. We tend to separate the idea of work and off-time these days, for me, if you rather let them melt into one, it doesn't feel like work all the time.

Why have a side project?

Ross Drakes: I see my life as a rolling series of connections. Each project you work on has an impact on all future ones. When you work only on your “Day Job”, you are limited by the scope of the projects your company can commercialise. Side projects give you an opportunity to do something out of the scope of your normal work. There are no bounds or rules, you are free to scratch whatever creative itch or dream you have. This infuses your life with new skills and perspectives. These skills and perspectives, in turn, allow your daily work to improve.

Leigh-Anne Drakes: To feed the lateral thinking bits. Today, we often end up being so specialised and hyper-focused, as there is so much depth to even the smallest aspects of industries. I think side projects help widen perspective and remind us that there are so many more levels to our own capabilities outside of what we do daily. Also, when you look at it from a different angle, you quickly realise that it’s all connected anyway, in some form or another.

• • •

Diptych courtesy of Leigh-Anne Drakes and Ross Drakes.

• • •

Read more about the joy of side projects.


This series, devoted to side projects, is delivered in association with 50,000feet, an independent creative agency dedicated to helping brands and businesses soar.


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December 17, 2016

A Most Colorful Life: Painter Reginald Baylor, first meet-up, CreativeMornings chapter, launched 2014 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin


To an artist, both color and artist are idiosyncratic. With their respective nature in mind, neither can be tamed. It is the headiness of color that drives painter Reginald Baylor to find refuge in his process: color by numbers, color within lines, color applied to precisely crafted compositions.

In his CreativeMornings/Milwaukee talk, Baylor shared his youthful connection to coloring books. This object could be seen as a tool to conform. But to Baylor, a coloring book is a model of logic, similar to an architectural blueprint. Baylor’s paintings are composed of strategically plotted outlines, but their most distinct variable is color, which Baylor coined as his “spontaneity.” Although he colors within the lines, Baylor’s works don’t cling to convention. Each piece of artwork he shared was iterating two of the most visible and liberating forces: lines and color.


Reginald Baylor: Neighborhood, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

In his talk, Baylor referenced the painter Cy Twombly. When making lines, Twombly described the act this way: “It does not illustrate. It is the sensation of its own realization.” Baylor finds sensation in lines, amplified by the sensation of colors. With masking tape to achieve the linear clarity of his visual artistry, acrylics are selected purposely and applied vigorously to achieve a canvas—plotted, populated and personified in color.

Baylor’s first wave of work was driven by observation. On the surface, associating colors with roses, lollipops and butterflies, as Baylor expressed, sounds trite. Yet it magnifies realities, delightful ones, that are a part of the world and taken easily for granted. Baylor’s medley of color-and-image pairings is a method shared by the astrophysicist Carl Sagan, who pointed to such colorful associations in his book “Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors: A Search for Who We Are” (1992):
“Fireflies out on a warm summer’s night, seeing the urgent, flashing, yellow white phosphorescence below them, go crazy with desire.” 
“Peacocks display a devastating corona of blue and green…” 
“Luminiscent squid present rhapsodic light shows, altering the pattern, brightness and color radiated from their heads…”
From roses, lollipops and butterflies to fireflies, peacocks and squid, a sliver of nature is identified and recognized immediately for the colors of its essential appearance. Without the reality of color, experiencing the natural and the artificial, and every being and thing in between, would be void of visual stimulation.

In 1740, the mathematician Louis Bertrand Castel compared his findings from examining the phenomenon of color with Newton’s “spectral description of prismatic color.” Castel published “L’Optique des Couleurs” in Paris. It displays this charming diagram:



Baylor’s paintings are proactive études in color and its perception. They’re in the exploratory vein of Castel and his contemporaries who were enamored with the perception and science of color. A fascination with optics. To behave as a prism yields a clear benefit: Take in people, places and objects as a rainbow—not reducing anyone and anything to a single impression, a single color.

Intellectually and emotionally, the prisms of ourselves and the world present a reality endowed with visual richness. The opposite of this inheritance is a life robbed of the wealth of light.


Source: Bill Healy for NPR

After 22 years in prison, Tyrone Hood was released. He received clemency from 41st Illinois Governor Pat Quinn when it was proven that he was wrongly imprisoned. In an interview with National Public Radio’s Steve Inskeep, he described the long-repressed experience in terms of color. As Hood put it, on being outside and coping with the shock of a new environment unfamiliar to him and his senses:
“The colors was very limited: dark blue, light blue shirt, grey as the bars and white ceiling. That was it. So when I seen the color red, I stared at it. It was a pop machine, or something in front of this gas station. I just looked at that machine for a while, because of the color red.”
Hood’s experience of a restricted color palette was not just harsh. It was dehumanizing. Access to color is living unchained. This is a life full of light. It is a prism set free.

Color is civilization. The human interaction with color goes back 1.3 to 1.8 million years ago, when the earliest human beings began to use fire and tools.



In 1947, LIFE magazine’s Ralph Morse became the first to photograph the paleolithic art throughout the network of caves known as Lascaux in southwestern France. These paintings that portray primarily large animals—horses, cattle, bison, among others—are estimated to be 17,300 years old. From the February 24, 1947, issue:
“[Cro-magnon human] ground colored Earth for rich reds and yellows, used charred bone or soot black for dark shading and made green from manganese oxide…”
Echoing our ancestors, Baylor and his art remind us to live and give the most colorful life imaginable.

• • •

“Color is primarily Quality. Secondly, it is also Weight, for it has not only color value but also brilliance. Thirdly, it is Measure, for besides Quality and Weight, it has its limits, its area, and its extent, all of which may be measured.”
—Paul Klee (1879–1940), Painter
• • •

Big thanks: to The Box MKE (who also hosted), MKE Production Rental, Holey Moley Coffee + Doughnuts, Wellspring for sponsoring Milwaukee CreativeMornings #1; to organizer Paul Oeming and to the Milwaukee CreativeMornings crew for their volunteer work in making CreativeMornings happen in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Especially big thanks: to Tina Roth Eisenberg—Swissmiss—for inventing CreativeMornings in 2008.

• • •

Read more CreativeMornings coverage.


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December 6, 2016

Pride, Work and Necessity of Side Projects: Meghan Arnold’s Advent Activism



What are you working on—on the side?

I recently launched a side project on December 1 called Advent Activism. I was incredibly depressed following the Election. After a week crying in bed and two weeks of being angrier than I’ve ever been, I decided to turn my emotions into action when I was putting up my Christmas decorations.

A couple of years ago, a designer-friend from Germany gifted me a beautiful handmade traditional Adventskalendar with an individual felt stocking for each day. Instead of stuffing it with candy or gag gifts, I was inspired to pick a different charity for each day of the calendar (December 1–24), and make a small donation.

From my time living in a (now) red state (Wisconsin), as well as serving on the board of Walk San Francisco here in California, I know how critically focused local organizations (or chapters of national orgs) can be in “first response” to the social justice needs of states. Since there are 30 red states, I decided to find organizations in each and highlight one each day as well as make a small donation.

I’ll reveal at least one each day of Advent. The focus of the organizations run the gamut from reproductive rights to LGBT youth services to racial justice. My hope is that these folks get some exposure to people in blue states looking for ways to help with direct services in so-called “Middle America.” The first organization I highlighted, HICA (immigrant services in Alabama), followed up, not only with a more in-depth look at their programs, but also to let me know they received three additional donations—thanks to being spotlighted.

Every year, those of us that celebrate, talk at length about finding “the true meaning of Christmas.” I’m not sure if this is it, but it does make me feel a lot better to shine a light on underrepresented voices than to camp out at the mall for deals.

How do you manage to work
on your side project(s)?

Just like anything, you need to find a way to make it part of your routine. This project is very important to me, so I try to tackle it as soon as I get up in the morning. A few years ago, I retrained myself to become a morning person. I find that setting aside a couple hours in the morning, before intellectually interacting with other humans, is a great way to make headway on side projects.

For this particular project, since the daily posts are the same format, I’ve been doing my best to try to get a few written and scheduled out in advance so that it gets done. Still, a lot (including making the donations) is something that I want to actively do on its assigned day. I have two Google Docs for the project. I created a process doc, with the daily steps, as well as posts and communications that can be tailored as I go. I also have a gigantic spreadsheet that I set aside an evening to create when I decided to do the project. It has all the organizations for each state, with links, news articles, etc. Makes my life way easier to have researched and prepped BEFORE I began the project. The projects where I jump in and research on the fly always fail. You can’t double the workload for yourself!

Advent Activism also has a very set timeline for the daily stuff, so I know that I’ll get a break in a few weeks. Self-care, y’all.

Finally, I’ve been on a Facebook diet and it’s amazing how much time you get back when you’re not in the endless scroll!

Why have a side project?

It’s a great opportunity to build up new skills or dust off old ones that have been latent for a bit.

In my current role, I don’t do a lot of writing, so it’s nice to have a project to keep up those skills (which admittedly have dulled in the last few years). This particular project also required a tremendous amount of research, which I absolutely love when it’s subject matter I’m fascinated with, like the social justice response to political machinations.

In terms of new skills, I had never mapped a domain to Wordpress before last week (had always been on my list). Also, though I work in design, I’m not a designer, but hope to maybe play around with some of the template stuff once the daily writing is over. If I do this again next year, perhaps it’ll look even better!

• • •

Diptych courtesy of Meghan Arnold.

• • •

Read more about the joy of side projects.


This series, devoted to side projects, is delivered in association with 50,000feet, an independent creative agency dedicated to helping brands and businesses soar.


Please consider supporting Design Feast
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December 2, 2016

Life, Work, Tools: Alex Mendoza, Sign Painter



What is your tool—the one that helps you 
do the things you do?

Quill sign painting brush. I use several brands including Andrew Mack, Luco and French Masters.

How has this tool helped you?

I have been able to do a lot of lettering and graphics with a quill. It is the king of sign painting brushes, because it is the most versatile. I can achieve fat strokes to fill in a letter, thin strokes to outline a letter and a fine point for tiny details. There are a few other brushes out there, including flat and liner brushes. For lettering, you can use a quill to paint script, casual and block styles. In my opinion, it would be harder to paint those alphabets with a flat or liner, but every sign painter is different. If I could only have one brush, it would be a quill.

• • •

Images courtesy of Alex Mendoza.

• • •

Explore these other Design Feast series: Designer’s Quest(ionnaire) / Blogger’s Quest(ionnaire) / Makers / Side Projects


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November 18, 2016

Pride, Work and Necessity of Side Projects: Femke van Schoonhoven, Designer, Writer and Podcaster



What are you working on—on the side?

My friend, Charli Prangley, and I would often chat about issues we face as designers and freelancers. After a while we realized, ‘Hey, we should be recording these!’, and our side project “Design Life” was born.

“Design Life” is a podcast about design and side projects for motivated creators. We saw a gap in the podcast market for a conversational show about design and the issues young creatives face. As female serial side project addicts, we felt there was a need for more female voices in the podcast and design industry, and that we had interesting stories to share.

We release an episode every Monday. Our conversations are about design and the issues creatives face as they try to progress their careers, juggle side projects, stay motivated and bring ideas to life.

Along with the podcast, I also interview underserved creatives in “The Creative Series.” I grew tired of seeing the same popular and famous designers being featured in all of the magazines and publications, so felt there was a need to showcase the lesser known, but equally as talented and inspiring creatives in our industry.

Lastly, I write articles and help people pursue their side projects through my newsletter and website Femke. I love helping people by sharing my stories, struggles and experiences. Common topics that I discuss are things around running an effective freelance business, dealing with clients, work/life balance, overlapping the day job with a side project, clear mindset and imposter syndrome. You can subscribe here.

How do you manage to work
on your side project(s)?

One of the best things I’ve learnt, since working on side projects, is that there is no such thing as more time. It’s up to you to make time for things important to you.

Since adopting this mindset, I’ve managed to accomplish far more in my side projects than I initially thought was possible. I make time for the tasks on my to-do list or the meetings that I have by treating them as priorities and scheduling them in my day. As I have a day job, scheduling and making time for my side projects is the only way I’ll get the opportunity to work on them.

Establishing a routine has also been immensely valuable for my productivity. I wake up at the same time every day and spend the first two hours on side projects before logging in to my day job. This time in the morning provides me with uninterrupted and dedicated focus time.

Lastly, you have to have passion for your side projects. If you lack passion, you’ll find excuses to not work on them. Choose a project that you know you’ll be passionate about and know you’ll want to commit to, even when the forces are against you.

Why have a side project?

There are so many benefits to starting a side project. Maybe you want a creative outlet to fulfill a passion of yours that’s not currently being fulfilled elsewhere. Alternatively you might want to grow an audience through helping and teaching people by sharing what you know. Your side project could be something serious or something completely fun—it doesn’t matter!

There’s so much to be learnt from a side project. For me, my side projects help challenge me in areas that are unfamiliar territory, learn and grow, and develop relationships with an awesome community of people. It’s incredibly rewarding when you’re able to help someone with something they’re struggling with.

• • •

Photography by Owen Williams and Charli Prangley, courtesy of Femke van Schoonhoven.

• • •

Read more about the joy of side projects.


This series, devoted to side projects, is delivered in association with 50,000feet, an independent creative agency dedicated to helping brands and businesses soar.


Please consider supporting Design Feast
If you liked this lovingly-made interview, show your appreciation by helping to support my labor of love—Design Feast, which proudly includes this blog. Learn more.